Opera

Katya Kabanova

Leoš Janáček (1854 – 1928)
Sung in Czech with German surtitles
Opera in three acts | Libretto: by the composer, after the play "The Storm" (1859) by Alexander Ostrovsky | World premiere: 1921 in Brno

Silvia Hauer, Mirko Roschkowski, Chor
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Sabina Cvilak
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Sabina Cvilak, Dalia Schaechter, Silvia Hauer
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Sabina Cvilak, Silvia Hauer, Chor
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Aaron Cawley, Statisten
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Silvia Hauer, Benedikt Nawrath, Sabina Cvilak, Mirko Roschkowski
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Silvia Hauer, Benedikt Nawrath
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Sabina Cvilak
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Wolf Matthias Friedrich, Dalia Schaechter
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Sabina Cvilak
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Sabina Cvilak
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Sabina Cvilak, Aaron Cawley
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Benedikt Nawrath
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Ensemble, Chor
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Benedikt Nawrath, Statisten
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Aaron Cawley, Dalia Schaechter
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Mirko Roschkowski
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Silvia Hauer
Photo: Paul Leclaire
Dalia Schaechter
Photo: Paul Leclaire

Czech composer Janáček belonged to a wave of twentieth-century composers whose works sought greater realism and connection with everyday life, combined with a more all-encompassing use of musical resources. Janáček’s breakthrough to fame and recognition came quite late, and his masterpiece “Katya Kabanova” only premiered when the composer was almost 70 years of age. He was inspired by Moravian and other Slavic folk music and speech patterns to create an original, modern musical style, one which he described as “a window into people’s souls” and “a unique imprint of the inner life of an individual”. Folklore found its way into his music not only by means of folk song, but rather through his assimilation of rhythm, pitch contour and inflections of normal Czech speech.

A connoisseur of Russian literature, Janáček discovered the material for his new opera when he saw Ostrovsky’s play “The Storm”. Katya’s guilt, atonement and self-reproach gave rise to what the composer described as “the tenderest of my operas” and “music from the depths of the heart”. Katya, who has married a weak, frigid man, is plunged into emotional and moral conflict, the force of which can only find resolution in her own death in the waters of the river Volga.

Cast

Conductor Philipp Pointner
Director Matthew Wild
Stage Designer Matthias Schaller, Susanne Füller
Costume Designer Susanne Füller
Lighting Designer Ralf Baars
Chorus Master Albert Horne
Dramaturgy Regine Palmai
Katya Sabina Cvilak
Boris Mirko Roschkowski
Kabanicha Nadine Secunde
Tichon Aaron Cawley
Dikój Wolf Matthias Friedrich
Kudrjasch Joel Scott
Varvara Silvia Hauer
Kuligin Christian Balzer
Chor des Hessischen Staatstheaters Wiesbaden, Hessisches Staatsorchester Wiesbaden

Dates

RevivalGrosses Haus19:30 - 21:10
RevivalGrosses Haus19:30 - 21:10
RevivalGrosses Haus19:30 - 21:10
RevivalGrosses Haus19:30 - 21:10
RevivalGrosses Haus19:30 - 21:10